Schedule

Class time: MWF 9:05 – 9:55   Class location: Clough 102

Notes:

  1. This schedule is tentative and subject to change. See WebAssign for the actual Reading Assignments to be completed before class on the corresponding day.
  2. Seminars suitable for review (for bucket point credit) are listed here.

Office hours:

  1. Nick Darnton, W 11 AM-12 PM, Howey Interaction Zone (S105, next to front office)
  2. Bo Lee, W 6-7 PM, Howey Interaction Zone (S105)
  3. Jessica Faubel, Th 1:30-2:30 PM, Howey Interaction Zone (S105)
  4. JC Gumbart, F 10-11 AM, CULC (in our classroom or a nearby empty room; if no one comes, I will stay until 10:15 and then go to my office in Howey W202)

Date Class Reading Lectures

Week 1

1/8 1 College FB > Physics? No class
1/10 2 5.3 Heat and temperature (review)
5.3.2 Thermal properties of matter (review)
5.3.2.1 Thermal energy and specific heat (review)
Course introduction; Thermal energy and heat flow
1/12 3 Interlude 2: The Micro to Macro Connection
7. Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics
7.1 Kinetic theory: the ideal gas law
7.2 The 1st law of thermodynamics
First Law

Week 2

1/15 No reading Martin Luther King Jr. Day
1/17 Snow day!
1/19 4 7.2.1 Organizing the idea of energy
7.2.2 Enthalpy
7.2.3 Thermodynamic equilibrium and equipartition
7.2.3.1 Example: Degrees of freedom
Building up to Enthalpy

Week 3

1/22 5 Why do we need a 2nd Law?
7.3.1 The 2nd Law of Thermodynamics: A Probabilistic Law
7.3.2 Implications of the Second Law of Thermodynamics: Entropy
Degrees of Freedom
1/24 6 No reading Energy Sharing and Distributions
1/26 7 7.3.2.1 Why entropy is logarithmic
7.3.2.3 A way to think about entropy — sharing
7.3.2.2 Biological consequences of the 2nd Law
7.3.2.4 Example: Entropy and heat flow
The Second Law of Thermodynamics

Week 4

1/29 8 7.3.3 Motivating free energy
7.3.3.1 Gibbs free energy
7.3.3.1.1 Example: Free energy of an expanding gas
Free energy; Free energy examples
1/31 9 7.3.4 How energy is distributed: Fluctuations
7.3.4.1 Boltzmann distribution
7.3.4.2 Boltzmann distribution and Gibbs free energy
The Boltzmann distribution, fluctuations, and entropy
2/2 10 4.2.4.1 Charge and the structure of matter
4.2.4.3 Coulomb’s law
4.2.4.3.2 Reading the content in Coulomb’s law
Recap: Electric charge and force; Electric fields

Week 5

2/5 11 8.1 The Electric field
8.1.2 Making sense of the idea of field
Electrostatic potential
2/7 12 6.2.3 Electric potential energy
8.2 The electric potential
Electrostatic potential: Examples
2/9 13 8.2.1 Motivating simple electric models
8.2.1.1 A simple electric model: a line charge
8.2.1.1.1 Line-charge integral
8.2.1.2 A simple electric model: a sheet of charge
Charged lines and sheets

Week 6: TEST 1 Tues. 2/13, Howey L1

2/12 14 No reading Review for test
2/14 15 8.4.1 Two parallel sheets of charge
8.4.2 The capacitor
8.3.3 Dielectric constant
Capacitors; Dielectrics
2/16 16 8.3.1 Screening of electrical interactions in salt solution
8.3.1.1 Debye length
8.3.2 Nernst potential
Electrostatics in a fluid

Week 7

2/19 17 8.5.1 Quantifying electric current
8.5.2 Resistive electric flow: Ohm’s law
Electric current
2/21 18 8.5.3 Ways to think about current: A toolbox of models
8.5.5 Electric energy and power
Resistors
2/23 19 8.5.4 Kirchhoff’s principles
Resistors in series
Resistors in parallel
Circuits

Week 8

2/26 20 No reading More on circuits
2/28 21 No reading More on circuits
3/2 22 Batteries in series and parallel
A complex network
More on circuits

Week 9

3/5 23 9. Oscillations and waves
9.1 Harmonic oscillation
9.1.1 Mass on a spring
Harmonic oscillation
3/7 24 9.1.1.1 Hanging mass on a spring
9.1.1.2 The pendulum
9.2 Waves in 1D
Oscillations in other systems
3/9 25 9.2.1 Waves on an elastic string
9.2.2 Wave pulses
9.2.2.1 Propagating a wave pulse – the math
Waves

Week 10: TEST 2 Tues. 3/13, Howey L1

3/12 26 No reading Review for test
3/14 27 No reading Waves (cont.)
3/16 28 9.2.3 Wave speed
9.2.5 Sinusoidal waves
Making sense of sinusoidal waves
Superposition of waves

SPRING BREAK

Week 11

3/26 29 9.2.4 Superposition of waves in 1D
9.2.4.2 Standing waves
Standing waves (cont.)
3/27 30 No reading The ray model of light
3/30 31 10 Three models of light
10.1.1 Basic principles of the ray model
10.1.2 Flat mirrors
Refraction

Week 12

4/2 32 10.1.3 Curved mirrors
10.1.3.1 Curved mirror equations
10.1.4 Lenses
Curved mirrors
4/4 33 10.1.4.1 Lens equations
10.2.1 Electromagnetic radiation and Maxwell’s rainbow
Curved mirrors (cont.)
4/6 34 10.2.2 Huygens’ principle and the wave model
10.2.2.1 The math of Huygens’ principle
Lenses

Week 13

4/9 35 10.2.3 Two-slit interference
10.2.4 Diffraction
10.2.4.1 Interference from two wide slits
Huygens’ model and two-slit diffraction
4/11 36 10.3 The photon model of light
10.3.1 Basic principles of the photon model
10.3.1.1 Reconciling the wave and photon model – sort of
Single-slit diffraction
4/13 37 10.4 Color and light
10.4.1 Visual implications
The photon model

Week 14: TEST 3 Tues. 4/17, Howey L4(?)

4/16 38 No reading Review for test
4/18 39 6.4.1 Energy at the sub-molecular level
11 The wave model of matter
Vision
4/20 40 11.1 Quantum oscillators – discrete states
11.2 Quantum string
11.3 Fluorescence
Energy quantization

Week 15

4/23 41 No reading REVIEW

Exam Week

5/2 FINAL EXAM Time: 6:00-8:50 PM Location: TBD